First comes love. Then comes marriage. Then comes the collapse of humanity. Then comes dissolution of the sun. Then comes entropy.
Emily, 25, baker by trade, crafter, book lover, and all-around nerd. Way too many fandoms.

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

This is both a really great answer to that specific question, and a really great example of how to draw an analogy between your experience and someone else’s.

(via anghraine)

   
reblogged 7 hours ago @ 20 Apr 2014 with 8,553 notes via/source
Everyone wants to be Batman, but everyone should be Captain America.
reblogged 17 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 14,571 notes via/source

gallifreyanconsultingdetective:

dianeraeb:

siriuus:

do action movies know they can have more than one female character

Someone should make an action movie with all girls except for one guy and have no explanation or mention of it in the movie and then pay all of the actors to act surprised like they’d never noticed when they get the inevitable storm of questions. 

This one male must have a shower scene, be saved by the protagonist at least once, and fall in love with a lead female.

reblogged 18 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 111,528 notes via/source

daeneryus:

one day sansa stark is gonna get pushed too far and she’s just gonna fucking lose her shit and start screaming and killing people and singing i’m not your toy by la roux and later surrounded by dead bodies she’s gonna compose herself and be like “i’m so sorry, that was very unladylike wasn’t it”

reblogged 19 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 22,871 notes via/source

nightvaleswimclub:

So, after much work and a long day of con going, I was finally able to put together a complete set of pics of my Secret Police cosplay!
I am really happy how this turned out ya’ll. And I even got to take a picture with Jeffrey Cranor!

This set also includes close ups of the patches and the tickets I gave out, both of which were designed by me and custom ordered. The tickets are on actual carbon paper! very neat.

Overall, I am super super happy to finally wear this. It was just a ton of fun.

reblogged 21 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 10,179 notes via/source

katebishopss:

next time someone compares grant to natasha (w/ grant somehow coming on top??/), i hope to god she pops out of nowhere and dropkicks them so hard the bruises last for years 

reblogged 21 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 19 notes via/source

katebishopss:

captaiinmarvel replied to your post: next time someone compares grant to na…

coulson v/o: “next week on agents of shield.” v/o: “black widow, sir. she’s coming.” [montage of nat kicking people’s faces in] coulson: “i thought she was on our side!” “no, sir. not since…we complimented ward.” [ward looking deader than usual]

i will not rest until this happens i s2g

reblogged 21 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 9 notes via/source
I met my wife at a Star Trek convention. She was study abroad from France and spoke little English, and I didn’t know a lick of French. So, for the first few months of our relationship, we communicated by speaking Klingon.

Hear more tales of nerdery in this week’s Pwn Up! (via dorkly)

Okay I’m not even a Star Trek fan but that’s beautiful.

(via tchy)

   
reblogged 22 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 97,741 notes via/source

chroniclesofamber:

Cyber-Dys-Punk-Topia

“There was a place near an airport, Kowloon, when Hong Kong wasn’t China, but there had been a mistake, a long time ago, and that place, very small, many people, it still belonged to China. So there was no law there. An outlaw place. And more and more people crowded in; they built it up, higher. No rules, just building, just people living. Police wouldn’t go there. Drugs and whores and gambling. But people living, too. Factories, restaurants. A city. No laws.

William Gibson, Idoru

It was the most densely populated place on Earth for most of the 20th century, where a room cost the equivalent of US$6 per month in high rise buildings that belonged to no country. In this urban enclave, “a historical accident”, law had no place. Drug dealers, pimps and prostitutes lived and worked alongside kindergartens, and residents walked the narrow alleys with umbrellas to shield themselves from the endless, constant dripping of makeshift water pipes above….

Kowloon ‘Walled’ City lost its wall during the Second World War when Japan invaded and razed the walls for materials to expand the nearby airport. When Japan surrendered, claims of sovereignty over Kowloon finally came to a head between the Chinese and the British. Perhaps to avoid triggering yet another conflict in the wake of a world war, both countries wiped their hands of the burgeoning territory.

And then came the refugees, the squatters, the outlaws. The uncontrolled building of 300 interconnected towers crammed into a seven-acre plot of land had begun and by 1990, Kowloon was home to more than 50,000 inhabitants….

Despite earning its Cantonese nickname, “City of Darkness”, amazingly, many of Kowloon’s residents liked living there. And even with its lack of basic amenities such as sanitation, safety and even sunlight, it’s reported that many have fond memories of the friendly tight-knit community that was “poor but happy”.

“People who lived there were always loyal to each other. In the Walled City, the sunshine always followed the rain,” a former resident told the South China Morning Post….

Today all that remains of Kowloon is a bronze small-scale model of the labyrinth in the middle a public park where it once stood.

This isn’t to say places like Kowloon Walled City no longer exist in Hong Kong….

— from Anywhere But Here: Kowloon “Anarchy” City

reblogged 22 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 19,169 notes via/source